Social Media Manners, Fit Pics, and the Death of the Suit

Here’s what you missed on the most recent Style & Direction bi-weekly stream!

This week features Ethan, Spencer, MJ, Matthew, Kiyoshi, Aldous, Jason, Steve, and John.

Social Media Manners & Taking Pics in Public

A topic posited by our loveable Curmudgeon (Kiyoshi), we discuss social media manners, specifically when we take pictures of everyday life and post it on socials. Is it about creating a personal brand? What’s the difference between us and #influencers? Is there a way to take pictures naturally without causing a stir in public?

I recommend reading my essays on menswear photography, film photography, and a few of the fun “editorials” like the Getty, Pie N’ Burger, and our Big NYC Trip recap.

How We Take Fit Pics

Taking Fit Pics are serious business and each of the SadBois have their own way of doing it. Whether it’s the classic mirror selfie to the posed DSLR self-timer (with gratuitous dramatic lighting), we discuss it all! Hopefully some of you will pick up some tips and get inspired to share your own outfits!

The Death of the Suit

This topic came from a short conversation I had with Jordan, a friend of mine who isn’t into menswear. He asked me about my thoughts on the “death of the suit” and if I could respond to the fact that suit sales have dropped 75% during the course of the pandemic. I pointed him to a few articles, like this one about Saville Row and this one about how J. Mueser is doing well, as well as a piece on the post-sneaker world.

Basically, I do agree that tailoring (and by extension, the tie) is dying. As the world gets more casual (not just during COVID), there is less demand for classic menswear, which has lead to the bankruptcies of J. Crew and Brooks Brothers. However, this mainly applies to broad society, where suits/ties are worn for work and formal events.

In the stream, the boys and I argue that classic menswear should be considered a niche interest, akin to the different facets of streetwear. While salarymen in suits may be on the decline, there are quite a bit of guys who can appreciate wide lapels, grey flannels, and loafers. It is this small subset of men who will keep classic menswear alive, not for the boardroom, but for themselves. If only more guys saw it that way!

Do We Want People to Dress Like Us (in Classic Menswear)?

That final point on the previous topic lead to a small discussion on whether or not we’d want everyone to dress like us. The short answer is no, simply because we want to see everyone find the style they like- it doesn’t have to be classic menswear.

Receiving Compliments/Comments After a Style Evolution

Lastly, on the same release week of the Old Ethan Essay, I ask the boys if they have had “feedback” on their style evolution. I mention in my essay that many people prefer my “older” pics, mainly because the outfits are more accessible and “trendy” instead of my intentionally slouchy take on classic/vintage menswear. A lot of the guys have had similar experiences, where they had better feedback when they were more on the #menswear or even dandy side, rather than the restrained looks we see today.

Don’t forget to support us on Patreon to get some extra content and access to our exclusive Discord. Catch us streaming on Twitch every Wednesday and Saturday or watch the clips on Youtube.

Oh and don’t forget, we do a podcast every two weeks!

Buh-bye!

StyleandDirection | EthanMWong | SpencerDSO

The Podcast is produced by MJ and Matthew.

Big thank you to our top tier Patrons (the SaDCast Fanatics): Seth Peterson, Austin Malott, Eric Hall, Philip Gregard, Shane Curry, and Audrey Jessica.

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